Using a GIS-based network analysis to determine urban green space accessibility for population and future green space planning - For Example Parks in ALMadinah AL Munawarah – Essay Example

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Distribution Pattern Analysis of Public Parks and accessibility in Madinah Using GIS Technique Contents 14) References……………………………………………………………………………………………………. ……………………………………. …….. ….. ………. 46 15) Questionnaire………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. .……. .………. .………. .51 List of Figures List of Tables 1. Introduction Green spaces and parks are of great importance both for ecological balance and for the health of individuals (Frumkin, 2001). They play a fundamental role in providing opportunities for rest and relaxation and enjoying the beauty of nature for the urban population. The focus of this paper is the distribution and accessibility analysis of public parks with regard to all segments of the population. When there is a significant increase in population and urban growth in a region, the need for public places of recreation increases.

For example, in Britain, the area dedicated to national parks and green areas is approximately 10,000 square miles, which represents 17% of England and Wales’ total area of (Cullingworth, 1972). Increasing rates of urbanisation in Madinah have led to increased pressure on many of the services and facilities, especially green spaces and gardens which are a key requirement for high density neighbourhoods. Green space refers to an area of land or water mass that either remains in its natural form or is used for agricultural purposes (Chang. 2008).

Green spaces are free from industrial, institutional, commercial and residential use and development. While most green spaces are publicly owned, others are private properties and consist of undeveloped coastal lands, undeveloped, scenic lands, public parks, forest lands and estuarine lands (Forman & Godron. 2006). In urban areas, however, where land development is predominant, green space may encompass areas such as wetlands, recreational areas, vacant lots or narrow corridors for walking or cycling. Cultural and historic resources also form part of green space in some countries.

In addition, green space is crucial as it absorbs and expels pollutants from the environment, by acting as an urban heat sink thereby protecting urban biodiversity. As agricultural pressures on land increase through greater demands for land, green spaces are slowly becoming depleted (Forman 2005). However, as development becomes a key priority, more land that was previously set aside for agricultural purposes is being developed into residential or institution areas (Van, 2007). This has led to scarcity of green space, and access to the available few is hampered by the prospect of development.

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