The best parenting style – Research Paper Example

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On the one hand, some are “rebellious and have been involved in alcohol and drug abuse” (B. Clock, personal communication, October 20, 2012). Some have developed “bullying behaviors” (B. Clock, personal communication, October 20, 2012). On the other hand, others are very “obedient and efficient in following rules” (B. Clock, personal communication, October 20, 2012). Block underlined that they follow because of “fear for punishment, and not because they believe that it is right” (personal communication, October 20, 2012). Happiness is elusive too: “I have interviewed these children and none of them are happy.

They may project high self-esteem, but they are very uncertain in discussing their goals and identity” (B. Clock, personal communication, October 20, 2012). Hence, children of authoritarian students are not always happy and successful in their chosen fields, probably because of their reaction to their parents’ authoritarian control on their lives. Permissive parents may be too lenient, although they can raise self-assured and disciplined students too. Permissive parenting has little rules and demands; these parents are very responsive to their children’s emotional needs (Shaffer, 2009, p.

378). The idea is to give their children the autonomy to find their identities and happiness (Bernstein, 2011, p. 369). Their children can have different attitudes, depending on how they perceive their parents’ disciplinary measures or the lack thereof (Bernstein, 2011, p. 369). Block narrated that permissive parents tend to spoil their children because they do not have strict rules (personal communication, October 20, 2012). She said: “They are extremely responsive to the needs of their children. They want to give almost everything that their children want” (B. Clock, personal communication, October 20, 2012).

Permissive parents do not expect their kids to follow rules well because they are seen as having “low self-control” (B. Clock, personal communication, October 20, 2012). These parents want their children to see them as “friends more than as parents” (B. Clock, personal communication, October 20, 2012). Block explained that the effects of permissive parenting on children’s behaviors vary from being sociable and happy to being insecure and not being independent (personal communication, October 20, 2012). She said: “Some children are doing quite well. They are happy, sociable, and assertive.

They do well in school too” (B. Clock, personal communication, October 20, 2012).

References

Baldwin, D.R., McIntyre, A., & Hardaway, E. (2007). Perceived parenting styles on college students optimism. College Student Journal, 41(3), 550-557.

Bernstein, D.A. (2011). Essentials of psychology (5th ed). California: Wadsworth/Cengage.

Bornstein, M.H., and Zlotnik, D. (2009). Parenting styles and their effects. In J.B. Benson (Ed.), Social and emotional development in infancy and early childhood (pp.280-293). California: Academic Press.

Evans, W. (2012, April 1). Authoritative parenting is best for young adults, studies say. Deseret News. Retrieved from http://www.deseretnews.com/article/765565085/Authoritative-parenting-is-best-for-young-adults-studies-say.html?pg=all

Kail, R.V., & Cavanaugh, J.C. (2010). Human development: A life-span view (5th ed.). California: Wadsworth/Cengage.

Shaffer, D.R. (2009). Social and personality development (6th ed.). California: Wadsworth/Cengage.

Weiten, W., Dunn, D.S., & Hammer, E.Y. (2012). Psychology applied to modern life: adjustment in the 21st century (10th ed.). California: Wadsworth/Cengage.

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